2022 Legislative Update: Week 3

Advocacy , Olympia Update ,

Week Overview

General Update

The first cut-off of session is quickly approaching on Thursday, February 3rd, which means all bills must pass out of their house of origin policy committees or they will be considered dead unless deemed ‘Necessary to Implement the Budget’ (NTIB). A reminder that policy committees are things like health care, education, and environment where the focus is on the substance of a bill rather than the fiscal impact. Because this week is leading up to policy cutoff, committee agendas will be filled with mostly executive sessions where committees consider potential amendments and vote bills out of committee.

The next cutoff date is just a few days later on Monday, February 7th. By this date all bills referred to fiscal committees must pass out of their house of origin fiscal committee (Appropriations, Finance and Capital Budget Committees in the House, Ways & Means in the Senate, and both Transportation Committees). Because of the short turnaround between these two cutoffs, some of the fiscal committees will convene next Saturday February 5th.

The legislature passed the fast-tracked legislation to delay implementation of the state’s new Long-Term Care program (WA Cares) for 18 months. The bills (HB 1732 and HB 1733) both passed off the Senate floor on Wednesday evening and the Governor signed the bills on Thursday. These were the first bills of the 2022 session to pass. SHB 1732, delays the state’s new long-term care payroll tax to address solvency concerns and other issues raised about the first-of-its-kind program. The tax is now delayed until July 1, 2023. The second bill, ESHB 1733 would allow certain people to voluntarily exempt themselves from paying into the tax. The exemptions include veterans with a service-connected disability of 70% or higher, spouses or partners of active-duty members, people who live outside of Washington state while working in the state and people working in the U.S. under a temporary, nonimmigrant work visa.

The number of bills being introduced each day has slowed to a trickle, though there are still a few new ones being introduced every day. At this point 1,009 have been introduced this session. A reminder that this is in addition to the bills from last session that didn’t pass that were re-introduced this year.

Click here to watch this week’s TVW Week in Review, which provides a good wrap-up of the past week in Olympia.

Electeds & Elections

On Friday the Senate passed SR 8639- Honoring the life of Senator Doug Ericksen (R-Ferndale) and his legislative accomplishments on what would have been his 53rd birthday. Senate colleagues honored Senator Erickson, who died December 17, 2021 after a five-week battle with COVID-19. Senator Ericksen represented the 42nd legislative district in the Washington State House of Representatives from 1998-2010 and the Washington State Senate from 2010 until his death.

Sen. Reuven Carlyle (D-36) announced that he won’t run for re-election. In his Facebook post sharing the announcement, Carlyle stated “I'm fully invested in civic life. There's more to come.” The Senate seat vacated by Carlyle will be filled in the upcoming general election.

Rep. Noel Frame (D-36) announced that she will be running to fill the Senate seat vacated by Carlyle.

Priority Areas

Climate Change and the Environment

Rep Lekanoff introduced HB 1753 on behalf of the Governor, and it requires state agencies that administer funds from certain accounts created by the Climate Commitment Act to offer consultation to federally recognized tribes who tribal resources may be affected by the award of funds form the accounts. It requires applicants for funding from certain Climate Commitment Act accounts to engage in a preapplication process with all federally recognized tribes within the project area. The bill was heard on January 13th, amended and passed by the House Environment & Energy committee on January 27th. It was considerably changed and a summary of changes can be found here.

Sen Nguyen and Rep Hackney sponsored SB 5722/HB 1774 on behalf of the Governor and it requires the Department of Commerce to adopt state energy management benchmarking requirements for specified tier 2 covered buildings by December 1, 2023 and rules for performance standards by December 31, 2030. It also requires Commerce to evaluate benchmarking data to determine energy use and greenhouse gas emissions averages for building type by July 1, 2029. SB 5722 was heard on January 13th in the Senate Environment, Energy & Technology committee and is scheduled for executive session on Feb 2nd. HB 1774 has been referred to the House Environment & Energy Committee but has not been scheduled for a hearing.

Rep Ramel and Sen Liias introduced HB 1767/SB 5666 on behalf of the Governor, and it authorizes the governing body of municipal electric utilities and public utility districts (PUD) to adopt a targeted electrification plan that establishes a finding that utility outreach and investment in the electrification of customers’ end use equipment in residential and commercial buildings will provide net benefits to the utility or PUD. It authorizes municipal electric utilities and PUDs, upon the adoption of a targeted electrification plan, to offer incentives and establish other programs to accelerate the targeted electrification of homes and buildings for their customers. HB 1767 was heard on January 18th, passed on January 20th in the House Environment & Energy committee, and referred to the House Rules committee for further consideration. SB 5666 was heard on January 19th in the Senate Environment, Energy & Technology committee.

Rep Duerr and Sen Liias sponsored HB 1770/SB 5669 on behalf of the Governor. HB 1770 was amended by the House Local Government committee and it updates the minimum State Energy Code requirements for residential and nonresidential construction. It requires new buildings to be net-zero ready and the State Building Code Council to adopt statewide residential reach code and requires the Department of Commerce to develop a proposal covering the technical provisions. Additionally, it preempts local residential codes with the Washington State Energy Code and the Statewide Residential Reach Code. The bill has been referred to the House Rules committee for further consideration. SB 5669 was referred to the Senate Environment, Energy & Technology committee but has not been scheduled for a hearing.

Housing

Accessory Dwelling Units (ADUs)

Rep Gregerson sponsored HB 1337, which originally incentivized the development of accessory dwelling units (ADUs). The bill was introduced in the 2021 session but did not pass so has been reintroduced. A proposed substitute bill was heard in the House Local Government committee on January 12th, and it requires cities and counties to adopt 14 specified requirements related to ADUs within urban growth areas, except to the extent that doing so would violate any existing laws or regulations related to public or environmental health, safety, or welfare. It also exempts action taken by cities and counties in complying with the provisions of the bill from challenges under the GMA and SEPA. The bill was scheduled for executive session on January 21st, but no action was taken.

Rep Shemake and Sen Liias introduced HB 1660/SB 5648, which deals with ADU regulations. HB 1660 was amended by the House Local Government committee to require the housing element of a comp plan to allow for the construction of ADUs within an urban growth area and requires the removal of barriers to such construction, including certain identified regulations. It removes exemptions in current law that would allow cities to require off-street parking for ADUs within a quarter mile of a major transit center under certain circumstances and sets a deadline of July 1, 2023 for the removal of such provisions. Additionally, it prohibits homeowners’ associations, common interest communities, and restrict covenants from actively or effectively prohibiting ADUs within an urban growth area. The bill has been referred to House Rules for further consideration. SB 5648 was heard on January 25th in the Senate Housing & Local Government committee.

Rep Pollet sponsored HB 1711 and it allows cities and counties to offer incentives for the development of ADUs, including the waiver of fees, deferral of taxes, or waiver of regulations, if the ADUs are subject to binding commitments that they will not regularly be offered for short term rental and there is a program to audit compliance with the commitments. The bill was heard on January 12th, passed on January 21st in the House Local Government committee, and referred to the House Rules committee for further consideration.

Rep Walen introduced HB 1841, which allows for the construction of an ADU to be exempt from the property tax for the duration of time the ADU is rented to a low-income household. It was heard on January 20th and scheduled for executive action on January 31st in the House Finance committee.

Condos

Sen Gildon introduced SB 5758 and it directs the Housing Finance Commission to create a condo conversion tenant-to-homeowner program to assist tenants in multifamily buildings purchase a condo in buildings that are being converted to condo ownership. Income eligibility and other requirements for the condo conversion tenant-to-homeowner program must be based on the commission’s existing authority and similar to other homebuyer programs. The bill was heard on January 18th, amended and passed by the Senate Housing & Local Government committee on January 27th. It was amended to add a representative of a condo association or common interest community association to the affordable housing advisory board and requires the review conducted by the affordable housing advisory board on condo conversions to include specific condo association concerns, fee collection, and foreclosure fairness. The bill has been referred to Senate Rules for further consideration.

Homelessness

Rep Morgan introduced HB 1987, relating to establishing a task force on creating a new state housing and homelessness department. The bill establishes a task force to recommend an organizational structure for a new department focused solely on issues of housing and homelessness. The task force will create a blueprint for a new department to better align housing and homelessness programs that currently span across multiple agencies and partners. This bill was heard on January 25th in the House Committee on Housing, Human Services & Veterans.

Rep Chopp sponsored HB 1866 and it established the Apple Health and Homes Program (Program) to provide a 12 month, renewable supportive housing benefit to Medical Assistance enrollees who meet eligibility criteria related to medical risk factors and barriers to finding stable housing. It establishes the Office of Health and Homes within the Department of Commerce to acquire sufficient supportive housing units to fulfill the needs of persons enrolled in the Program. Additionally, it creates the Health and Homes Account with a portion of funds from the $100 housing surcharge for recorded documents to be used for supportive housing and appropriates $500 million from the Coronavirus State Fiscal Recovery Fund for the acquisition and development of supportive housing units. The bill was heard on January 20th and is scheduled for executive session on February 2nd in the House Health Care & Wellness committee.

Encampments

Sen Kuderer introduced SB 5662 on behalf of the Governor, which creates the Office of Intergovernmental Coordination on Public Right-of-Ways Homeless Encampments (Office) within the Department of Social and Health Services. It also requires the Department of Commerce to collaborate with the Office to develop and implement a statewide effort to reduce the number of persons encamped on public rights-of-way through transitions to permanent housing solutions. The bill was heard on January 13th and scheduled for executive action on January 27th in the Senate Housing & Local Government committee, but no action was taken. It has been re-scheduled for executive session on Feb 2nd.

Landlord Tenant Relations

Sen Kuderer introduced SB 5576 and it updates the 14-day pay or vacate notice and eviction summons to improve readability. It clarifies that for rental arrears accrued through 6 months following the end of the Governor’s state of emergency proclamation, a 14-day pay or vacate notice may not be issued until expiration of 14 days after a repayment plan is offered and the tenant fails to accept the offer. Additionally, it requires courts to accommodate virtual representation by legal counsel appointed for indigent tenants, as well as virtual participation for tenants. The bill was heard on January 11th, passed on January 19th in the Senate Housing & Local Government committee, and has been to the Rules committee for further consideration Sen Trudeau sponsored SB 5749, which allows tenants to pay for rent with a personal check, cashier’s check, or money order. The bill was heard on January 19th, amended and passed on January 27th in the Senate Housing & Local Government committee. The amended bill requires landlords to allow tenants to submit rent payments by mail or at an accessible, on-site location, and expands the application of the bill to manufactured housing landlords and tenants. The bill has been placed on second reading and awaits further action.

Rep Peterson introduced HB 1904 and it limits a landlord from increasing the rent to no more than 3% above the base rent without providing a written notice between 180 and 220 days before the increase takes effect. If the landlord does increase the rent above 3%, the landlord must provide notice to the tenant and allow for the tenant to terminate the lease at any point prior to the effective date of the increase and the tenant shall only pay pro rate rent through the date upon which the tenant surrender the premises. The bill was heard on January 18th and is scheduled for executive session on February 1st in the House Housing, Human Services & Veterans committee.

Land Use

Comp plan updates

Rep Duerr sponsored HB 1241 and it was amended in the House Local Government committee to increase the review and revision cycle for comprehensive plans under the GMA from 8 to 10 years. It also extends the deadline for the next comprehensive plan update for King, Kitsap, Pierce, and Snohomish counties, and for cities within those counties, from June 30, 2024, to December 31, 2024. The bill was referred to the House Appropriations committee and heard on January 27th. It is scheduled for executive session on Feb 1st.

Rep Duerr introduced HB 1978 and it increased the review and revision cycle for Shoreline master plans from 8 to 10 years so it aligns with the new revisions to the comp plan updates under the GMA. The bill was heard on January 19th and passed on January 21st in the House Local Government committee. It was passed by the House on January 28th with a 93-1 vote count and has been referred to the Senate for further consideration.

Rep Pollet introduced HB 1717 was amended by the House Local Government committee and at it requires counties, cities, and other local governments to enter into negotiations on a memorandum of agreement for collaboration and coordination with the tribe for participation in the planning process under the GMA, and provides for mediation if an agreement is not reached. It requires the Department of Commerce to provide notice to tribe of a city or county’s proposed adoption of a comp plan upon request of a tribe, and to facilitate a dispute resolution process to attempt to resolve a tribe’s concerns with a city or county’s comp plan or development regulations. Additionally, it requires a tribe that has a reservation or ceded lands within a county to be invited to participate in the countywide planning process. The bill was heard on January 27th in the House Appropriations committee and is scheduled for executive session on Feb 1st.

Rep Duerr sponsored HB 1099, which adds a goal of climate change mitigation to the listed goals of the GMA. It also adds a climate change and resiliency element to the list of elements that must be included within the comprehensive plans certain counties and cities must adopt under the GMA. Additionally, Commerce is required to publish guidelines that specify a set of actions counties and cities have available to take related to greenhouse gas emissions reductions and vehicle miles traveled. The bill was introduced during the 2021 session but did not pass so was reintroduced. The bill was passed by the House with a 57-41 vote count on January 21st. It has been scheduled for a hearing on February 1st in the Senate Housing & Local Government committee.

Missing Middle Housing

Sen Das and Rep Bateman sponsored SB 5670/HB 1782 on behalf of the Governor requires cities to incorporate into its development regulations, zoning regulations, and other official controls, authorization for the development of all missing housing types on all lots zones for detached single-family residential use and within one-half of a major transit stop. It also creates minimum average density requirements for cities based on population and directs the Department of Commerce to provide technical assistance to cities. Both had a hearing on January 18th in the respective Local Government committees. SB 5670 was amended and passed on January 27th in the Senate Housing & Local Government committee. The bill was substantially changed and a summary of the changes can be found here. It has been referred to the Senate Ways & Means committee for further consideration. HB 1782 has been scheduled for executive session on February 1st in the House Local Government committee.

Rep Pollet introduced HB 1981 and it requires the Department of Commerce to undertake a study to determine the costs to cities and counties to revise their comprehensive plans and ensure compliance with the Growth Management Act; to distribute funds from the Local Government Support Account to ensure jurisdictions receive adequate funding for comprehensive plan updates; to provide planners and specialists to jurisdictions in developing comprehensive plans, along with model ordinances for plan implementation; and appropriates $25,000,000 for the Department of Commerce to provide grants to Clark, King, Kitsap, Pierce, Snohomish, Thurston, and Whatcom counties, and the cities within those counties, for the costs of planning and meeting new requirements imposed under the Growth Management Act in the 2021-2022 Legislative Session. It also expands the requirements of the housing element of the comprehensive plan to address displacement, increased economic integration, and affordable housing near transit. Authorizes increase in property tax levy of up to three percent based on population and inflation, with the difference between the increase and a one percent increase required to be used for planning under the Growth Management Act. Additionally, it authorizes additional graduated state real estate excise tax to fund the Local Government Planning Support Account, with funds primarily be used by the Department of Commerce to provide grants to local governments for required comprehensive plan updates, and secondarily by the Department of Commerce to provide staff support and other assistance to local governments in planning. The bill was heard on January 18th and is scheduled for executive session on February 1st in the House Local Government committee.

Salmon recovery

Rep Lekanoff introduced HB 1117, which adds the goal of salmon recovery to the listed goals of the GMA. The bill was introduced in the 2021 session but did not pass so has been reintroduced. It also requires the land use element of comp plans adopted under the GMA to include a strategy that achieves net ecological gain of salmon habitat. Additionally, it requires development regulations that protect critical areas to apply certain mitigation requirements.

The bill was amended and passed the House on January 26th with a 57-40 vote count.

Summaries of the adopted amendments can be found here and here. It now heads to the Senate for further consideration.

Urban Growth Areas (UGAs)

Rep Goehner sponsored HB 1627, which allows urban government services to be extended beyond city and urban growth area boundaries to meet the needs of those living within such communities, and water, sanitary sewage systems, and storm drains may be provided to properties outside of these boundaries to protect basic public health, safety, welfare, and the environment. The GMA hearing board nor a boundary review board my hear petitions based on the existence or extension of water, storm drainage, or sewerage systems outside of a city of urban growth areas boundary. It also allows for additional development and services in limited areas of more intensive rural development, based on the needs of the people in those communities. The bill was heard on January 11th, amended and passed on January 28th in the House Local Government committee. It was substantially changed and a summary of the changes can be found here.

Sen Short introduced SB 5593, which amends the current standards for jurisdictions to revise a designated urban growth area or areas to include revisions based on patterns of development. It provides that any revision to the existing boundaries of a jurisdiction’s UGA or areas may not result in an expansion of total surface area of the UGA if the revision is to accommodate patterns of development and anticipated urban growth. The bill was heard on January 12th, amended and passed by the Senate Housing & Local Government committee on January 27th. The bill was substantially changed and a summary of the changes can be found here. It has been referred to Senate Rules for further consideration.

Water

Sen Rolfes introduced SB 5585 on behalf of the Department of Ecology and it removes the existing cap on the fee charged for water quality permits administered by the Department of Ecology and creates an advisory committee to provide recommendations to Ecology for setting the water quality permit fee rate and schedule. The bill was heard on January 11th and passed on January 20th in the Senate Environment, Energy & Technology committee. The bill has been referred to the Senate Rules committee for further consideration.

Long Term Care

Rep Sullivan sponsored SHB 1732, which delays the collection of premium assessments under the long-term services and supports trust program until July 1, 2023, delays the availability of approved services under the trust program until July 1, 2026, and allows persons born before January 1, 1968, who do not meet the 10-year minimum for paying Trust program premiums to receive partial benefits based on the number of years of premium payments. The bill was passed by the House on January 19th with a 91-6 vote count. It was heard on January 24th and passed on January 25th in the Senate Ways & Means committee. The Senate passed the bill on January 26th with a 46-3 vote count and was signed by the Governor on January 27th.

Rep Paul introduced ESHB 1733, which establishes exemptions from the payment of premiums under the long-term services and supports trust program for certain veterans, spouses and registered domestic partners of military service members, nonimmigrant temporary workers, and employees who work in Washington and maintain a primary residence outside of Washington. The bill was amended by the House and passed on January 19th with a 67-29 vote count. It was heard on January 24th and passed on January 25th in the Senate Ways & Means committee. The Senate passed the bill on January 26th with a 38-11 vote count and was signed by the Governor on January 27th.

Paid Family & Medical Leave

Senator Robinson introduced SB 5649, relating to modifying the Washington state paid family and medical leave act. This bill was heard on January 13th, amended and passed on January 26th in the Senate Committee on Labor, Commerce & Tribal Affairs committee. The bill was substantially changed and a summary of changes can be found here. The substitute bill provides that an allowable purpose for family leave is any leave taken by an employee during the seven calendar days following the death of the family member for whom the employee would have qualified to take medical leave for the birth of their child or would have qualified for family bonding leave. It specifies that leave taken by certain employees in the first six weeks after giving birth must be medical leave, unless the employee chooses to use family leave. It expires the collective bargaining exception contained in the Paid Family and Medical Leave (PFML) program. It establishes an actuarial office within the Employment Security Department (ESD), which must report annually on the financial condition of the PFML program and requires ESD to report on specified fiscal areas of the PFML program. It requires ESD to publish a list of employers with approved voluntary plans on its website. It has been referred to the Senate Ways & Means committee for further consideration. It requires the Office of Financial Management to coordinate with another agency for actuarial services relative to the PFML program and report to the Legislature by October 1, 2022. And it creates a legislative task force on PFML program premiums

Unemployment insurance, family leave, and medical leave payments

Sen Keiser and Rep Berg introduced SB 5873/HB 2031, which lowers employees premiums for the Paid Family and Medical Leave (PFML) program to last year’s level. It would also lower unemployment insurance (UI) premiums for all employers and in 2023 it would target additional relief to small businesses. SB 5873 was heard on January 24th and scheduled for executive action on January 31st in the Senate Ways & Means Committee. HB 2031 has been referred to the House Labor & Workplace Standards committee but has not been scheduled for a hearing.

Transportation

Transportation Revenue

Conversations on a transportation revenue proposal seem to be heating up as the House and Senate Democrats continue discussions and negotiations. Sen Liias would like to fund a revenue proposal with federal dollars, revenue from the Climate Commitment Act, and a transfer from the general fund. A gas tax increase is not a component of the Senate proposal. We anticipate revenue proposals will be released in the next couple of weeks.

Looking Ahead

This week will see more public hearings and movement of bills out of committee.

Upcoming Dates:

  • February 3rd - House of Origin Policy Cutoff
  • February 7th - House of Origin Fiscal Cutoff
  • February 15th - House of Origin Floor Cutoff
  • February 24th - Opposite House Policy Cutoff
  • February 28th - Opposite House Fiscal Cutoff
  • March 4th - Opposite House Floor Cutoff
  • March 10th - Sine Die

 

Bellevue Chamber of Commerce Upcoming Events Report 

Finance (House) - Virtual - 1/31 @ 10:00am

HB 1643 - Exec Session - Exempting a sale or transfer of real property for affordable housing to a nonprofit entity, housing authority, public corporation, county, or municipal corporation from the real estate excise tax.

HB 1841 - Exec Session - Incentivizing rental of accessory dwelling units to low-income households.

Ways & Means (Senate) - Virtual - 1/31 @ 4:00pm

SB 5873 - Exec Session - Concerning unemployment insurance, family leave, and medical leave premiums.

Environment & Energy (House) - Virtual - 2/1 @ 8:00am

HB 2066 - Public Hearing - Concerning exemptions for infill development under the state environmental policy act. (Remote testimony.)

Housing & Local Government (Senate) - Virtual - 2/1 @ 8:00am

SB 5818 - Exec Session - Promoting housing construction in cities through amendments to and limiting appeals under the state environmental policy act and growth management act.

Housing, Human Services & Veterans (House) - Virtual - 2/1 @ 8:00am

HB 1904 - Exec Session - Protecting tenants from excessive rent and related fees by providing at least six months' notice for rent increases over a certain amount, allowing tenants the right to terminate a tenancy, and limiting late fees.

HB 2105 - Public Hearing - Concerning service of notice on landlords and tenants. (Remote testimony.)

Local Government (House) - Virtual - 2/1 @ 10:00am

HB 1782 - Exec Session - Creating additional middle housing near transit and in areas traditionally dedicated to single-family detached housing.

HB 1981 - Exec Session - Concerning local government planning.

Finance (House) - Virtual - 2/1 @ 1:30pm

HB 1819 - Exec Session - Increasing the personal property tax exemption.

HB 1990 - Public Hearing - Concerning a sales and use tax deferral for projects to improve the state route number 167 and Interstate 405 corridor. (Remote testimony.)

HJR 4208 - Exec Session - Concerning the taxation of personal property.

Appropriations (House) - Virtual - 2/1 @ 3:30pm

ESHB 1241 - Exec Session - Planning under the growth management act.

HB 1717 - Exec Session - Concerning tribal participation in planning under the growth management act.

Transportation (House) - Virtual - 2/1 @ 3:30pm

HB 2089 - Public Hearing - Modifying the bond authorization for the Interstate 405 and state route number 167 corridor and the Puget Sound Gateway facility. (Remote testimony.)

Ways & Means (Senate) - Virtual - 2/1 @ 4:00pm

SB 5426 - Public Hearing - Improving the equity of Washington state's tax code by creating the Washington state wealth tax and taxing extraordinary financial intangible assets. (Remote testimony.)

SB 5463 - Public Hearing - Exempting a portion of the valuation of residential property from property taxation. (Remote testimony.)

Environment, Energy & Technology (Senate) - Virtual - 2/2 @ 8:00am

SB 5732 - Exec Session - Concerning green roofs on large commercial and multifamily buildings.

SB 5842 - Exec Session - Concerning state laws that address climate change.

Civil Rights & Judiciary (House) - Virtual - 2/2 @ 10:00am

HB 1850 - Exec Session - Protecting and enforcing the foundational data privacy rights of Washingtonians.

Housing & Local Government (Senate) - Virtual - 2/2 @ 10:30am

SB 5662 - Exec Session - Concerning intergovernmental coordination to address transitioning persons encamped on state public rights-of-way to permanent housing solutions.

SB 5823 - Exec Session - Addressing local infrastructure project areas.

SB 5832 - Exec Session - Expanding the multifamily tax exemption program to include converting existing multifamily units.

SB 5964 - Public Hearing - Concerning consolidated local permit review processes. (Remote testimony.) (If measure is referred to committee.)

Environment & Energy (House) - Virtual - 2/3 @ 10:00am

HB 2066 - Exec Session - Concerning exemptions for infill development under the state environmental policy act.

Housing, Human Services & Veterans (House) - Virtual - 2/3 @ 10:00am

HB 2105 - Exec Session - Concerning service of notice on landlords and tenants.

Transportation (House) - Virtual - 2/3 @ 1:30pm

HB 2026 - Public Hearing - Implementing a per mile charge on vehicles. (Remote testimony.)

Transportation (Senate) - Virtual - 2/3 @ 4:00pm

SB 5828 - Public Hearing - Implementing recommendations of the autonomous vehicle work group. (Hearing is on the Proposed Substitute.) (Remote testimony.)

Finance (House) - Virtual - 2/4 @ 8:00am

HB 1990 - Exec Session - Concerning a sales and use tax deferral for projects to improve the state route number 167 and Interstate 405 corridor.